Bromofluorochloromethane (CHClBrF)

The molecule has two enantiomers: stereoisomers that are mirror images of each other and are not superimposable.

Phenol (C₆H₅OH)

The simplest of the aromatic hydroxy compounds.

Sulphur (S₈)

An odourless, yellow, solid substance, the 16th most common in the Earth´s crust. One of the best known sulphur compounds is pyrite, also known as ´fool´s...

Ammonia (NH₃)

Ammonia is a colourless gas with a characteristic pungent smell. Its solution in water is called ammonium hydroxide or household ammonia.

D-ribose (C₅H₁₀O₅)

The open-chain version of ribose, which occurs naturally in nucleic acids, coenzymes, nucleotides and nucleosides.

Water (H₂O)

Water is a very stable compound of hydrogen and oxygen, vital for all known forms of life. In nature it occurs in liquid, solid and gaseous state.

Hydroxide ion (OH⁻)

A compound ion formed when a water molecule releases a proton.

Cellobiose (C₁₂H₂₂O₁₁)

Cellobiose is the basic structural unit of cellulose.

Carbamide (urea) (CO(NH₂)₂)

An organic compound in the urine of mammals, used in the production of fertilisers as a source of nitrogen.

Chlorine (Cl₂)

A yellow-green toxic gas with a strong odour, one of the halogens.

Formamide (methanamide) (HCONH₂)

A colourless, slightly viscous, hygroscopic liquid used in the production of formic acid, hydrogen cyanide and other organic compounds.

Hydronium ion (H₃O⁺)

The presence of hydronium ions relative to hydroxide ions determines a solution´s pH.

Beryllium dichloride (BeCl₂)

Used in the production of beryllium and as a catalyst.

Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) (C₅H₈)

Synthetic rubber is produced by the polymerisation of isoprene.

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